MARINES WE HONOR

Our scholarships honor and memorialize Marines and Navy Corpsmen for their sacrifice and service to our Nation.

3_5_battalion_insignia

3rd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment

3rd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment

The honor, courage, and commitment of the Corp’s 3rd Battalion 5th Marine Regiment are unsurpassed. At no time has the valor of the Dark Horse Battalion been on more brilliant display that while deployed to the Sangin District of Helmand Province in Afghanistan in the fall of 2010. In a series of engagements now part of Marine Corps legend, the Dark Horse Battalion endured devastating losses, marking the highest sacrifice of any unit during OEF.

To honor these Marines, the Scholarship Foundation established the Dark Horse Memorial Scholarship in 2014. Since that time, we’ve awarded nearly half a million dollars in scholarship funds to more than 130 students. Through these scholarships, we not only memorialize our fallen Marines; we ensure their legacy of honor courage and commitment lives on through the lives of our outstanding young scholars.

Click here to support the 3rd Battalion 5th Marine Regiment Memorial Scholarship.

3_5_battalion_insignia
tim_sloat_2

Captain Timothy J. Sloat USMC (Ret.)

Captain Timothy J. Sloat USMC (Ret.)

Tim was born and raised in Carmel, CA and graduated from the University of California, Berkeley in 1964. While at Cal he was affiliated with Phi Gamma Delta. In August 1965 he enlisted and was selected for Officer Candidate School from which he graduated in December 1965. He graduated from TBS in May of 1966.

Tim arrived in Viet Nam as a member of 1st Batallion, 1st Marines in July, 1966. First serving as a platoon commander, by February of 1967 he was promoted to 1st Lieutenant and given command of a Combined Action Company comprised of 45 Marines and 90 Vietnamese Army troops. He was promoted to Captain in November of 1967. In addition to other commendations, Tim was awarded the Purple Heart; Combat Action Ribbon; Vietnamese Cross of Gallantry, and the Presidential Unit Citation.

In his civilian career, Tim was a licensed real estate broker and worked principally in the commercial retail and office sectors for a number of major firms. As a long-standing volunteer in support of Marine Corps-related activities; most notably that of orchestrating adoptions of Marine Corps units by cities and on behalf of the Marine Corps Scholarship Foundation, Tim was second to none! He personally organized over 20 adoptions of battalion-sized Marine Corps units by various cities throughout Southern California. The incredible support the involved cities offered and continue to offer the families of our Marines has proven to be of incalculable value. In addition, Tim was actively involved as a volunteer in support of the Marine Corps Scholarship Foundation for many years; building bridges between the Foundation volunteer civilian key personnel and active duty Marine Corps senior officer and enlisted leadership.

Tim was first and foremost a Marine and he will be missed by all who knew him.

Click here to support the Captain Timothy J. Sloat USMC (Ret.) Memorial Scholarship.

tim_sloat_2
Frank Atlee

Frank AtLee

Frank AtLee

Frank AtLee served our Country and Corps for three years as an officer in the U.S. Marine Corps. A graduate of Lynchburg College, he majored in biology and chemistry and later spent 28 years with American Cyanamid Co., retiring as president and chairman. Mr. AtLee went on to serve as Monsanto Company’s chairman of the board and chair of the Executive Committee from June 2000 to October 2003. He was Monsanto’s interim president and chief executive officer from Dec 2002 to May 2003. His deep understanding and passion for the business, coupled with a focus on collaboration and innovation, helped build Monsanto’s team and culture as it’s known today.

To honor Mr. AtLee, Monsanto Company has established the Frank V. AtLee III Scholarship that will forever honor his legacy and memory. Any new contributions received to commemorate the life and legacy of this great man will support future recipients of the Frank V. AtLee III Scholarship.

Click here to contribute to the Frank V. AtLee III Scholarship.

Frank Atlee
esmond-donald

Donald V. Esmond

Donald V. Esmond

Don Esmond is senior advisor to Toyota Motor Sales President and CEO Jim Lentz following a 30-year career with the company from which he retired as senior vice president, automotive operations, in July 2012.

Esmond attributes much of his success to the values and leadership skills he developed as an officer in the United States Marines Corps. During his five-year career, Don distinguished himself as a captain, naval aviator, and helicopter pilot in Vietnam. He was awarded the Silver Star, Distinguished Flying Cross, 45 Air Medals, and the Purple Heart.

In 1999, Don received the prestigious Semper Fidelis Award from the Marine Corps Scholarship Foundation, which is presented annually to an individual who has displayed “dedicated and inspirational civic and community leadership.” A faithful Marine, Esmond later joined the Marine Corps Scholarship Foundation’s board of directors on which he continues to serve today.

esmond-donald
west-bing

Francis J. “Bing” West

Francis J. “Bing” West

Bing West, a Marine combat veteran, served as Assistant Secretary of Defense in the Reagan administration. A nationally acclaimed war correspondent and author, he has been on hundreds of patrols in Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan.

A member of the Council on Foreign Relations, West has received the Marine Corps Heritage Award, the Colby Award for Military Non-fiction, the Veterans of Foreign Wars News Media Award and the Marine Corps Russell Award for Leadership. He and his wife Betsy live in Newport, Rhode Island.

west-bing
capadanno-vincent

Father Vincent R. Capodanno USN, MOH

Father Vincent R. Capodanno USN, MOH

A native of Staten Island, NY, and one of nine children, Vincent R. Capodanno was ordained a Catholic priest in June 1957. During the Vietnam War, Father Capodanno believed that the U.S. troops needed priests to support them, and he received his commission as a lieutenant in the Navy Chaplain Corps in 1965.

He was assigned to the First Marine Division in Vietnam in April 1966, where he frequently put himself directly in harm’s way to administer last rites to the dying and give medical aid to the wounded. He was mortally wounded on a Vietnam battlefield while serving with the Marine Corps in 1968. For his bravery and selfless sacrifice, he was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor in addition to the Bronze Star and Purple Heart.

capadanno-vincent
huff-edgar

Sergeant Major Edgar R. Huff USMC

Sergeant Major Edgar R. Huff USMC

Sergeant Major Edgar R. Huff was one of the first African-Americans to join the Marine Corps, the first African-American to be promoted to the rank of Sergeant Major, and the first African-American to complete 30 years of service. His journey started on September 24, 1942, when he arrived at Montford Point Camp in North Carolina with no military experience, a rugged toughness, and deep intelligence.

Through the battles of World War II, Korea, and Vietnam, SgtMaj Huff was recognized with two Bronze Stars, three Purple Hearts, three Navy Commendation Medals, the Navy Achievement Medal, and the Combat Action Ribbon. When SgtMaj Huff passed away in 1994, the Montford Point Marine Association established a scholarship in his name to honor his legacy. Not only did his service open doors for African-Americans, his scholarship now presents opportunity for the next generation of America’s leaders.

huff-edgar
benn-hazel

Colonel Hazel Elizabeth Benn USMC (Ret.)

Colonel Hazel Elizabeth Benn USMC (Ret.)

Colonel Elizabeth Benn began her career in 1941 as an education specialist with the Marine Corps, and until her death in 2004, remained steadfastly committed to present every Marine with the opportunity to continue his or her education.

During her career, Col Benn founded the Marine Corps Educational Service Branch, now called “Marine Corps Lifelong Learning.” Upon her retirement, she was awarded the Legion of Merit; she was one of the few women at the time to receive this honor. After her retirement from the Marine Corps, Col Benn also served as a member of the Department of Veterans’ Affairs Educational Assistance Advisory Committee, where she worked to develop the Montgomery GI Bill. The GI Bill was passed in 1985, allowing millions of veterans to seek a quality education. When Col Benn passed away in 2004, her estate established a memorial scholarship in her name, continuing her legacy of making quality education accessible to service members and their families.

benn-hazel
rockmore-martin

Brigadier General Martin F. Rockmore USMC (Ret.)

Brigadier General Martin F. Rockmore USMC (Ret.)

In 1939, Martin Rockmore graduated from St. Lawrence University in Canton, NY, on a football and basketball scholarship. Upon graduation, he enrolled in the Marine Corps’ officer training school, and as a second lieutenant, deployed to the Pacific in 1942. During World War II, Rockmore led his unit in the assault wave on Guadalcanal in the Solomon Islands and in the Battle of the Tenaru, and earned the Silver Star Medal for his bravery at Cape Gloucester. He retired from the Marine Corps in 1959.

In 1962, Rockmore read a newspaper article about a Marine who had been awarded the Medal of Honor but could not afford to send his son to college. He took action, rounding up a group of fellow Marines and organizing a dance to raise scholarship funds for the student. Thus, the New York Leatherneck Ball was born and, from that, the Marine Corps Scholarship Foundation, which has since awarded more than $80,000,000 in scholarship support to the children of Marines.

rockmore-martin
brewer-margaret

Brigadier General Margaret A. Brewer USMC

Brigadier General Margaret A. Brewer USMC

Brigadier General Margaret A. Brewer, the first female general officer in the Marine Corps, was commissioned in 1952. During her tenure in the Marine Corps, she served as Commanding Officer of the woman Marine companies at Norfolk, Virginia, and Camp Lejeune, North Carolina; as Director of Women Marines; and as Director of Public Affairs at Headquarters Marine Corps.

BGen Brewer’s work was critical to the eventual integration into an expanded role in the Corps. For meritorious service as the Director of Women Marines, she was presented the Legion of Merit by the Commandant of the Marine Corps on 30 June 1977. BGen Brewer retired from the Marine Corps in 1980. She passed away on January 2, 2013, at the age of 82.

brewer-margaret
cohen-michael

Corporal Michael R. Cohen USMC

Corporal Michael R. Cohen USMC

Corporal Michael R. Cohen, of Jacobus, PA, was one of four children and a graduate of Dallastown Area High School and York Technical Institute. Cpl Cohen’s family describe him as a hardworking student and an avid reader who loved scuba diving and valued public service—a value that eventually led him to the Marine Corps.

Cpl Cohen became a member of 1st Battalion, 3d Marines after September 11, 2001, and gave his life in combat on November 22, 2004, in Fallujah, Iraq, when he came under attack by enemy small-arms fire. His family has since established the Corporal Michael R. Cohen USMC Memorial Scholarship to honor and support hardworking students in his name.

cohen-michael
chavez-juan-rodriguez

GySgt Juan Rodriguez-Chavez USMC

GySgt Juan Rodriguez-Chavez USMC

GySgt Rodriguez-Chavez was awarded the Navy Cross, the country’s second highest honor for valor, by the President of the United States for his heroic actions on September 8, 2009, during the Battle of Ganjagal while deployed to Afghanistan. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, and alongside Medal of Honor Recipient Dakota Meyer, GySgt Rodriguez-Chavez entered the kill zone four times to recover the bodies of fallen team members.

A native of Acuna, Mexico, today, Rodriguez-Chavez lives with his wife and two daughters – Karyssa Idali and Kyra Isabel.

chavez-juan-rodriguez
kelly-robert

First Lieutenant Robert Kelly USMC

First Lieutenant Robert Kelly USMC

First Lieutenant Robert M. Kelly, the son of General John F. Kelly, was commissioned in the Marine Corps on Dec. 12, 2008. 1st Lt Kelly was assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force based in Camp Pendleton, California, at the time of his death in Afghanistan on November 9, 2010 (it was his third combat deployment).

1st Lt Kelly had a distinguished military career. His personal service awards include the Purple Heart, Combat Action Ribbon, Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal, Marine Corps Good Conduct Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal, Humanitarian Service Medal, Iraq Campaign Medal, Afghanistan Campaign Medal, and Sea Service Deployment Ribbon. Today, Robert’s mother, Karen, serves on the board of the Marine Corps Scholarship Foundation.

Click here to support the First Lieutenant Robert Kelly Memorial Scholarship.

kelly-robert
sammis-benjamin

Captain Benjamin Sammis USMC

Captain Benjamin Sammis USMC

A 1996 graduate of the Citadel, Captain Ben Sammis was a native of Rehoboth, MA, where he grew up an accomplished sailor, soccer player, Eagle Scout, and honors student. Upon graduating from the Citadel, he was commissioned in the Marine Corps; as a Marine, he followed his lifelong dream of being a combat aviator, earning his Wings in 1999 at the top of his class.

Captain Sammis had been in combat for 16 days on April 16, 2003, when he was flying close air support to his Marines just outside of Baghdad. His helicopter was exposed to enemy ground fire and crashed, killing him and his co-pilot. Today, the Benjamin Sammis Memorial Scholarship honors his legacy.

sammis-benjamin
zembiec-mendoza

Major Doug Zembiec USMC and Major Ray Mendoza USMC

Major Doug Zembiec USMC and Major Ray Mendoza USMC

Majors Doug Zembiec and Ray Mendoza were both champion college wrestlers, company commanders of Echo 2/1, and devoted fathers. Extraordinary infantry officers in the Marine Corps, the two were also friends. Both were killed in action while on deployment in Iraq.

To commemorate their friendship, leadership, and legacy, Scholarship Foundation investors established the Major Doug Zembiec USMC and Major Ray Mendoza USMC Memorial Scholarship, which has since become endowed and will be awarded in perpetuity in honor of these great Marines.

zembiec-mendoza
shea-kevin

Lieutenant Colonel Kevin Shea USMC

Lieutenant Colonel Kevin Shea USMC

Lieutenant Colonel Kevin Shea started his military career as an airman in the United States Air Force Academy, where he played rugby and football and cross-commissioned in the Marine Corps. LtCol Shea’s years of service included participation in combat operations in the first Gulf War, counter-drug operations in the United States, assistance with the Honduran Naval Infantry, and service as an instructor and rugby coach at the Naval Academy.

In 2003, he joined the 1st Marines and later deployed to Iraq with Regimental Combat Team 1. LtCol Shea died on his 38th birthday, September 14, 2004, the victim of enemy fire in Al Anbar Province, Iraq. He received the Bronze Star with Combat “V,” Purple Heart, Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Joint Service Commendation Medal, Navy-Marine Corps Commendation Medal with Gold Star and Joint Service Achievement Medal.

shea-kevin
carpenter-kyle

Corporal William “Kyle” Carpenter USMC, MOH

Corporal William “Kyle” Carpenter USMC, MOH

Corporal Kyle Carpenter received the Medal of Honor on June 19, 2014, for acts of valor on November 21, 2010, in Marjah, Helmand province, Afghanistan. At the time, Carpenter served with Company F, 2nd Battalion, 9th Marine Regiment when a hand grenade was thrown into the security position he shared with Cpl Nicholas Eufrazio. Cpl Carpenter moved to shield his fellow Marine from the grenade and absorbed most of the blast with his body. Having sustained severe injuries, Cpl Carpenter underwent a strenuous recovery process at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center before being medically retired from the Marine Corps on July 30, 2013.  Today, Carpenter is a student at the University of South Carolina in Columbia, South Carolina.

carpenter-kyle
meyer-dakota

Sergeant Dakota Meyer USMC, MOH

Sergeant Dakota Meyer USMC, MOH

Dakota Meyer was born and raised in Columbia, Kentucky, and enlisted in the United States Marine Corps in 2006. A school-trained sniper and highly skilled infantryman, Meyer deployed to Iraq in 2007 and to Afghanistan in 2009. In 2011, he was awarded the Medal of Honor for his unyielding courage in the battle of Ganjgal.

Sergeant Meyer has since partnered with the Marine Corps Scholarship Foundation to raise more than $1,000,000 in scholarships for the children of Marines, naming 12 endowed scholarships after his fallen comrades. He has met and spent time with the Scholarship Foundation recipients of his scholarships and speaks frequently at schools and veteran events to raise awareness about our military.

meyer-dakota
Carl Mundy

General Carl E. Mundy, Jr.

General Carl E. Mundy, Jr.

USMC (Ret.) served for 38 years as an honorable and courageous United States Marine. His military career culminated when he was appointed as the 30th Commandant of the Marine Corps and member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff from July 1991 until his retirement in June 1995. Thanks to the generous support of General Dynamics, the General Carl. E. Mundy, Jr. USMC (Ret.) Memorial Scholarship has been established. The Scholarship Foundation thanks General Dynamics for their contribution that will forever honor his legacy and memory. Click here to support.

Carl Mundy
Harold Boian

TSgt. Harold Thomas Boian

TSgt. Harold Thomas Boian

Born March 23, 1918, TSgt. Harold Thomas Boian USMC was a native of Dayton, Ohio. In April 1944, Boian enlisted in the United States Marine Corps. He completed boot camp at Parris Island, S.C. and was then trained as a Combat Correspondent. In August 1944 he arrived on Guadalcanal and was assigned to the newly formed Sixth Marine Division, comprised of the 4th Marines, the 22nd Marines and the 29th Marines, with artillery support from the 15th Marines. He was assigned to an infantry company in the 29th Marines. After the war, Boian returned home to Ohio and worked at the Dayton Daily News. He never had a chance to enjoy the benefits of a college education, but his family says he would be honored to be associated with an organization which focuses on providing that opportunity for the children of those who have given so much to their country. Please click here to support the TSgt Harold T. Boian Memorial Scholarship.

Harold Boian
Lee Sargent

Captain George "Lee" Sargent Jr

Captain George "Lee" Sargent Jr

Captain George “Lee” Sargent Jr entered into the marines after graduating from Harvard University to serve in the Vietnam War. While in Vietnam, he earned the following commendations awards for his service: the Bronze Star, Navy & Marine Corp Commendation Medal, Purple Heart, Vietnam Service Medal, National Defense Service Medal, and the Vietnamese Cross of Gallantry with Palm.

Upon completion of his active combat duty, he completed his second tour by serving as a Drill Instructor for troops destined for the Vietnam War. He trained hundreds of young Marines before completing his military career.

After leaving the Marines, he served as a teacher, coach, and athletic director at Noble and Greenough School & Tufts University in Massachusetts and Davidson College in North Carolina.

Click here to support the Lee Sargent Memorial Scholarship.

Lee Sargent